Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Wednesday Whine and Wine with Summer Devon


Grand Old Porny Words Edition

Why is the word whinge more interesting than whine? It’s not exotic for me—I heard it often from a good family friend when I was a whining kid. Yet it works better. So does “grizzling” another good substitute for whine. Some words just carry more “yeah, that’s what I’m talking about” authority than others.

Okay, enough with the theme of querulousness. Let’s head for the obscene words stat.


I generally think when it comes to sex, crude works. Cock seems more powerful than penis.
But there are times when a bit of rumpus-bumpus hanky-panky and extra syllables that sound latin-y might be fun.



A few years ago I wrote a historical called Someone to Cherish, about a totally sheltered young woman in 1880s New York City. It wasn’t difficult to make the heroine naïve—because I felt as clueless as she when I encountered some good old words our ancestors used. She was handed a slip of paper with words like fellatrice (women who suck cock), fricatrice (people who use their hand) and gamahuching (oral sex) and she had no idea what they meant. Me neither. I found those words and plenty more in that huge Victorian porn-fest by Walter - My Secret Life (The sex diary of a Victorian gentleman). 

Francis Grose's 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue is also online if you want more good old-fashioned language fun. 

The point is, our ancestors were just as dirty-minded and imaginative as anyone today.

True, we have some good words. Dingleberries is a good one-- but our forefathers and mothers had a word for the bits of stuff on the butt. They called them fartleberries.

And they have words for bits and activities I still haven’t encountered in our modern version, the urban dictionary. For instance Grose describes a rantallion is “one whose scrotum is so relaxed as to be longer than his penis, i.e. whose shot pouch is longer than the barrel of his piece.”

Sometimes a short phrase makes up for the lack of latiny length—something elegant rather than arresting like tipping the velvet (it might mean a French kiss, but it also seems to mean cunnilingus).

Here are some more good words from Francis and others:
Athanasian Wench:  A forward girl, ready to oblige every man that shall ask her.
Balum Rancum:  A hop or dance, where the women are all prostitutes. N.B. The company dance in their birthday suits.
Gingambobs:  Toys, bawbles; also a man’s privities.(balls have plenty of nicknames-- nutmegs, oysters, nick-nacks, plums, culls, tarriwags and about a thousand more)
Hopper-arsed:  Having large projecting buttocks
Madge Culls:  Gay men (Also Mollies) Some historians argue that there were words for the practice of gay sex but not the people who indulged because it wasn’t used as a form of identity. Hmm. Maybe before the 1800s that could have been true?

The Serious Client by Degas


Of course some the best phrases are for the grand act, or-- as our ancestors called it—fucking: Moll Peatly’s Gig, also Pully Hawly or rantum scantum. There are dozens more names for the event Grose calls “a rogering bout” (By the way, according to Grose, screwing is called “rogering” because bulls were often named Roger and bulls are randy creatures—and their pizzles are impressive organs.)

There might be as many names for jamming the plonker (the act of copulation) as there are for bushwackers and jigglesticks.(penises).  Here’s another fine online resource for just the names of  the peachy bits,  Two Timelines of Slang for Genitalia from 1250 through Today, and  for the dangly bits, A Timeline of Slang Terms for the Penis.

One more note: One of my favorite slang sources (mostly not sexual) the Historical Dictionary of Slang is unfortunately not offered online. But I see some copies aren’t too expensive! 



* * *

I’m working on a historical, and that’s why my brain is stuck in that world.

However, my release this week, Revealing the Beast, is a contemporary m/m shapeshifter story. This is the third story set in a kind of alternate world in which shapeshifters exist without drawing a lot of notice (speaking of euphemisms, shifting is called “translation” by polite people).




Desire that runs deeper than blood…


Solitary Shifters, Book 2

Colt Easton is easygoing, fun loving, good with little kids…and he occasionally turns into a beast capable of ripping out a man’s throat. It’s a family secret he’d be more than happy to keep—if there wasn’t a little boy’s life at stake.

A deathbed confession revealed the child could carry Easton blood. The only way Colt can monitor the boy is with a job at his day-care center. The problem? New laws decree that all shifters be tagged. No blood test, no job.

Dr. Jasper Glen is instantly drawn to the outgoing Colt and is certain any child would be safe in the handsome shifter’s care. He ought to know—he’s been studying shifters for years, even invented the blood test that now, to his shame, the government is using against them.

All it takes is a quick vial switch. Except Jasper’s good deed blows the lid off a secret he didn’t even know he was keeping. And triggers a chain of events that makes them all moving targets.

Revealing the Beast is now available from Samhain Publishing



For a short time, my co-author Linda Gayle and I are offering the first ebook in that world, a historical m/m/f at a discount. Formerly published by Loose Id as Claws on Silk, our story is now titled Predator’s Passion. It’ll be 99 cents through July 14. Available from Amazon and Allromance ebooks

See you Friday!



3 comments:

  1. I love it! I'm going to do my best to work rantum scantum into my next conversation.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am going to try working 'gingambobs' into my next teleconference...I guess I'll soon find out if anyone is actually paying attention during the meeting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL - Why not try a few bushwackers and jigglesticks as well & you might have to have a different word each teleconference or during a normal conversation :D

      Delete